Treatment of Sexual Dysfunction

Definition & History
Sexual Response Cycle & Dysfunction
How common are sexual disorders and what are the causes?
How are sexual disorders diagnosed?
How are sexual disorders treated?
Are these treatments effective?
Additional Resources & Links
References

 

DSM -IV TR Criteria for Sexual Dysfunctions

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The Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV Text Revision (DSM-IV TR) is the current version of the diagnostic manual which governs how psychological disorders are classified. SDs are separated into the following categories:

Desire Disorders

Hypoactive Sexual Desire

A. Persistently or recurrently deficient (or absent) sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity. The judgment of deficiency or absence is made by the clinician, taking into account factors that affect sexual functioning, such as age and the context of the person's life.

B. The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.

C. The sexual dysfunction is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (except another Sexual Dysfunction) and is not due exclusively to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition.

Sexual Aversion Disorder

A. Persistent or recurrent extreme aversion to, and avoidance of, all (or almost all) genital sexual contact with a sexual partner.

B. The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.

C. The sexual dysfunction is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (except another Sexual Dysfunction).

Arousal Disorders

Female Sexual Arousal Disorder or FSAD

A. Persistent or recurrent inability to attain, or maintain until completion of the sexual activity, an adequate lubrication-swelling response of sexual excitement.

B. The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.

C. The sexual dysfunction is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (except another Sexual Dysfunction) and is not due exclusively to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition.

Male Erectile Disorder, more commonly known as "erectile dysfunction"

A. Persistent or recurrent inability to attain, or to maintain until completion of the sewxual activity, an adequate erection.

B. The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.

C. The sexual dysfunction is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (except another Sexual Dysfunction) and is not due exclusively to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition.

Orgasm Disorders

Female Orgasmic Disorder, formerly known as "Inhibited Female Orgasm"

A. Persistent or recurrent delay in, or absence of, orgasm following a normal sexual excitement phase. Women exhibit wide variability in the type or intensity of stimulationthat triggers orgasm. The diagnosis of Female Orgasmic Disorder should be based on the clinican's judgment that the women's orgasmic capacity is less than would be reasonable for her age, sexual experience, and the adequacy of sexual stimulation she receives.

B. The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.

C. The sexual dysfunction is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (except another Sexual Dysfunction) and is not due exclusively to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition.

Male Orgasmic Disorder, also formerly known as "Inhibited Male Orgasm", and "retarded ejaculation"

A. Persistent or recurrent delay in, or absence of, orgasm following a normal sexual excitement phase during sexual activity that the clinician, take int oaccount the person's age, judges to be adequate in focus, intensity, and duration.

B. The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.

C. The sexual dysfunction is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (except another Sexual Dysfunction) and is not due exclusively to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition.

Premature Ejaculation

A. Persistent or recurrent ejaculation with minimal sexual stimulation before, on, or chortly after penetration and before the person wishes it. The clinicians must take into account factors that affect duration of excitement phase, such as age, novelty of the sexual partner or situations, and recent frequency of sexual activity.

B. The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.

C. The premature ejaculation is not due exclusively to the direct effects of a substance (e.g., withdrawal from opiods).

Pain Disorders

Dyspareunia

A. Recurrent or persistent genital pain with sexual intercourse in either a male or female.

B. The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.

C. The sexual dysfunction is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (except another Sexual Dysfunction) and is not due exclusively to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition.

Vaginismus

A. Recurrent or persistent involuntary spasm of the musculature of the outer third of the vagina that interferes with sexual intercourse.

B. The disturbance causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.

C. The sexual dysfunction is not better accounted for by another Axis I disorder (except another Sexual Dysfunction) and is not due exclusively to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition.

Other Sexual Disorders

Sexual Dysfunction due to GMC
Substance Induced Sexual Dysfunction
Sexual Dysfunction NOS

Specifiers

  1. Lifelong Type vs. Acquired Type
  2. Generalized Type vs. Situational Type
  3. Due to Psychological Factors vs. Due to Combined Factors

 

This website was composed by RoseMary Beitia, a master's level Clinical Health Psychology degree candidate at Appalachian State University, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for PSY 5715 Psychotherapy Interventions II, instructed by Dr. Bob Hill.